World Free Press Institute



           Supporting free expression and free press everywhere


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Why a free press matters

now more than ever

Around the world, authoritarian governments are seeking to extinguish free expression and dissent. We're doing what we can to help journalists do their jobs and protect their rights.

Threats to democracy are growing daily around the world . From Hong Kong to Belarus, governments around the world are seeking  to extinguish the very freedoms guaranteed by the United Nations' Universal Declaration on Human Rights. An informed populace is freedom's last best hope.

The World Free Press Institute is a California-based 501(c)3 non-profit organization formed in 1997.  We work to improve, support and strengthen a free press in its role as a government watchdog  and opponent of tyranny around the world.

 

Our goal is the education of students and working journalists in the skills needed to maintain independence and credibility in a free-market economy, and especially in communicating cultural heritage issues.

 

We offer training programs, on-site assistance, and expertise in media business and management issues. We also provide a wide variety of journalism skill programs ranging from basic reporting and editing to sophisticated specialty reporting techniques in all areas of traditional and new media. 

Funding for our programs has been provided by UNESCO, the Ford Foundation, the Eurasia Foundation, the Upjohn Foundation, Friederich Ebert Stiftung, the National Geographic Society and private individuals who share our commitment to the free exchange of ideas and information.

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What we do

Training in fact-based reporting

We work with individual journalists and media organizations on a broad spectrum of training issues including fact-based reporting, critical media consumption skills, leadership training, capacity building, investigative reporting, environmental reporting and financial sustainability. We structure our programs to meet the needs and requests from journalism groups, and create programs using trainers from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

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Free press support

Journalists in repressive countries are often isolated, prevented from sharing their thoughts and insights by repressive governments. Our programs bring together bright journalists to learn from each other and make connections that can be invaluable in repressive countries.



Pictured: Tatiana Repkova, WFPI, Slovakia, and Lawrence Mute, a constitutional law expert in Nairobi.

Specialized reporting

Journalism organizations request the types of training they feel would most benefit them, and we assemble experts in that field to provide training. In one case our program focused on environmental reporting for journalists near the failed Chernobyl nuclear reactor. In another, we brought together journalists from neighboring African countries at war with each other to discuss peace reporting. We host workshops in journalism ethics and ways basic principles can be adapted to fact-based local reporting.

In photo, Sam Mbure of the Network for the Defence of Media in Africa hosts a panel discussion.

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A sense of empowerment

Irene Bwire of the Tanzania Media Women's Organization and Gail Talma of the Seychelles Press Association find common ground at a workshop in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Evaluations of the programs showed journalists felt the relationships and shared insights were valuable

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Our programs

In the past two decades our programs have included  sponsoring meetings of journalists in regional centers across Belarus, university-sponsored programs in Hungary and the Czech Republic, and a UNESCO-sponsored symposium of journalists from 17 East African nations meeting together in Nairobi. We've produced programs for local journalists in Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Hungary, Uganda, Czech Republic and many other countries. We've learned that journalists speak a common language.

 

Belarus media support

In many countries, journalism is considered a crime. Reporters are hounded and editors jailed. We discuss ways reporters can protect themselves. In this photo, constitutional lawyer Mikhael Pastukhov and public defender Yuri Toporashev of the Belarussian Association of Journalists provide insights to reporters  in this seminar.

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East Africa  assembly

Kifle Mulat, president of the Ethiopian Free Press Journalists Association, describes the state of the media in his country.  Kifle has served multiple prison sentences for publishing an independent newspaper, as have many of his peers.

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Education & outreach

Often journalists in developing countries have not had access to journalism education programs. We see our mission as broadening perspectives on what is news and what audiences seek. In this photo, WFPI trainer Marcia Parker prepares for a session on business and financial reporting.

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Management training

Every newsroom - even small ones - need an understanding of setting goals and laying the ground work to meet them. Competitive issues are a critical part of this planning and play a role in whether a news organization can be sustainable. Human resource problems can be devastating to a young company. We hold management symposia and encourage critical thinking.


In photo, newspaper editor Lullit Michel of Addis Ababa describes a branding strategy to strengthen her paper's competitive advantage. Less than two weeks later, her newspaper, the Daily Monitor, was shuttered by the government.

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Opportunities for networking

Being a journalist in an authoritarian environment can be a lonely calling. Opportunities to meet with peers and discuss challenges facing them can be extremely valuable. We attempt to bring talented journalists together to share their problems and solutions. Many reported meeting peers for the first time at the conference even though they lived and worked a short distance away.

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Tracking corruption

Many countries are not able to win financing from international banks or foundations if their country has a history of corruption. We have insights into how journalists can track money entering the country to see how it is spent. In this photo, investigative reporter Bob Porterfield, winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, discusses overseas sources of information on grant funding and investment by foreign corporations and how that can be useful.

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Digital media

All of our trainers have experience in digital media, and in every program we discuss what has worked and what hasn't in the group's experience.

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Our mission

The World Free Press Institute is a California-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization formed in 1997. Our mission is to improve, support and strengthen a free press in its role as a government watchdog  and opponent of tyranny around the world.


Our goal is the disinterested education of students and working journalists in the skills needed to maintain independence and credibility in a free-market economy, and especially in communicating cultural heritage issues. We offer training programs, on-site assistance, and expertise in media business and management issues.


We also provide a wide variety of journalism skill programs ranging from basic reporting and editing to sophisticated specialty reporting techniques in all areas of traditional and new media. And through our Maya Archaeology Initiative we support cultural heritage education, protection of Maya antiquities, and biodiversity in the Guatemalan rainforest.


Funding for our programs has been provided by UNESCO, the Ford Foundation, the Eurasia Foundation, the Upjohn Foundation, Friederich Ebert Stiftung, the National Geographic Society and private individuals who share our commitment to the free exchange of ideas and information.

The people behind WFPI

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President, World Free Press Institute

Clay Haswell

A reporter, editor and media executive for more than 40 years, Clay was managing director of the Associated Press for Asia and the Pacific. Previously, he was AP bureau chief for California and Nevada, and also worked for the Australian, the Christchurch (NZ) Press, the Anchorage (AK)  Daily News and the Contra Costa Times. After leaving the AP he was CEO of a company that built social networking platforms for students in Asia.

Contact
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Our story

We began working together in 1997 when several major foundations asked us separately to provide training for journalists in Central Europe. After collaborating on several projects, we  decided be more efficient if we worked together.  For two decades we worked together on international training programs, augmenting our efforts with expertise from local journalism professionals.

We've had success getting grants from multiple organizations to support our programs. We've learned from experience how to relate to journalists from different backgrounds and traditions.

But careers intervened.

We were at points in our professional lives when promotions and increased management responsibilities overtook our ability to collaborate on projects. Postings to opposite ends of the earth took us out of proximity. 

Now, with more time of our own, we continue to be committed to making free expression not an ideal but a reality. We continue to believe we can help journalists in need of support.


After a hiatus, we decided to resume our efforts and share whatever we can with aspiring journalists.

In photo, Saminya Bounou of Comoros accepts a diploma for completing a training program.

 
 
 

Inside a WFPI seminar

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Getting together as program begins

An informal cocktail party breaks the ice as a seminar begins.

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Program leaders from different backgrounds collaborate

At the start of a program in Nairobi, trainers Patricia Made of Zimbabwe and Tatiana Repkova of Slovakia discuss presentations on HIV / AIDS coverage.

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Learning from each other

Divided into teams, journalists discuss environmental reporting in the so-called Chernobyl dead zone at a conference in Gomel, Belarus to address ethical questions and coverage ideas.

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A time for celebration, reflection and goodbyes 

At the conclusion of a program in Nairobi  sponsored jointly by the Ford Foundation and UNESCO, participants get together for a group photo.

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"Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers."

- Article 19,  United Nations Universal Declaration on Human Rights



“Freedom of the press is not just important to democracy,
it is democracy.”


- Walter Cronkite

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Contact World Free Press Institute

Get in touch with World Free Press Institute to learn more about our work and how we can work together.

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